Live actively to be 100

A dozen centenarians will make the scene each day – the fastest growing segment of the good old U. S. A.

It’s true that people live to be a hundred years or more. Their number is increasing fast like nothing seen before.

The average years that people live increases every day, ’cause Medicare and other plans make everything OK.

When I was born I could expect to live to fifty-five.
I passed that age long time ago – I’m glad to be alive.

Some baby-boomers do expect to live a hundred years. It’s natural for us to wish to outlive all our peers.

Most women take their estrogen to give their lives a lift.
It helps them to survive and prove that a life’s a precious gift

They say that you are just as old as you profess to feel.
But that’s a lie ’cause people die of age they can’t conceal.

So if you want some good advice on how to stay on earth,
use common sense in what you eat and LIVE for all you’re worth.

Another Mike Majeske limerick

A fellow named Jack

There once was a fellow named Jack
who found he’d developed a knack
for verse anapestic
and phrases majestic:
as he gave his new talent a whack-

It’s simple as driving a hack
or nailing a board to a shack
If you have ambition
you have my permission
to give it a good-sporting crack..

You need not be taken aback
if you think it’s talent you lack.
Just pick up a pencil
right after commensal
and enjoy the app1ause from the c1acque,

You may write about old bric-a-brac
or Monday night’s poor quarterback.
Whatever your choice is
We must hear your voices.
Just think like a mad maniac.

Another Mike Majeske limerick

Joseph F. Majeske School

The Joseph F. Majeske School, located in the Poletown Historic District at 139 Trombly Avenue, Detroit, MI started as an apprenticeship training school run in cooperation with several unions in the area. In the early 1920’s, an elementary school program was added. Soon after it was converted into an open-air school for the preservation of tuberculosis. The building and all surrounding buildings were bulldozed in the 1980’s so General Motors could put up another factory.

You can view a few photos at the Library of Congress.

Charles “Joe” Boyd

joe and virginia boydCharles “Joe” Boyd, 97, of Mansfield, died April 24, 2015. Born January 2, 1918 in Broughton, PA, he was the son of Duncan and Mary (Doran) Boyd. An Army Air Corps veteran, Joe served during WWII. In 1956, he and his wife came to Mansfield from Detroit so he could work for General Motors as the logistics manager. He was a member of St. Peter’s Catholic Church, Mansfield Liederkranz, Elks Lodge, and BPOE #56.

Surviving are his children, Tom (Anne) Boyd of Mansfield, Nancy (Richard) Wair of Charleston, SC, Kay Foltz of Mansfield, and Gail (Charles) Bird of Athens; eight grandchildren; and 16 great-grandchildren.

Along with his parents, Charles was preceded in death by his beloved wife of 72 years, Virginia Boyd, who died exactly one year prior, on April 24, 2014; five brothers; and five sisters.

Joe was a role model and inspiration for men everywhere and will be missed.

Virginia Boyd

IMG_0831Virginia Marie Boyd, 96, of Mansfield, Ohio died April 24, 2014. Born September 15, 1917 in Detroit, MI, she was the daughter of Alex and Clara (Gutenberg) Kennedy. Virginia and her husband moved from Detroit to Mansfield in 1956 with the opening of General Motors. A true homemaker, Virginia enjoyed gardening, sewing, and doing ceramics. Her grandchildren were her pride and joy. She was a member of St. Peter’s Catholic Church.

She is survived by her husband of 72 years, Charles Boyd, whom she married February 11, 1942 at St. Birchman’s Church in Detroit, MI; son, Tom (Anne) Boyd of Mansfield; daughters, Nancy (Richard) Wair of Charleston, SC, Kay Foltz of Mansfield, and Gail (Charles) Bird of Athens, OH; eight grandchildren; sixteen great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews.

Virginia was preceded in death by her parents and two brothers, John and Edward Kennedy.

What a terrific lady and great friend to Noreen.

My Grandpa

This is a poem I wrote for my grandpa who died (Harry Cooper), but it can apply to any lost loved one.

I love grandpa
We all do
We can cry for him
But we shall not
Die for him
He would want us
To be strong
To remember him
To carry on his legacy
To keep living
He would not want us
To remain in the past
Because one day
We will see him
Again in
Heaven

We will rejoice
And cry
And make up lost years
We will be happy

For me,
I will not only
See him,
I will see my
Summer sunshine
And all my
Other grandparents
That have left
Our world
And others that have
Not gone yet
And won’t for many
Years

Be strong
Today
We did not want this
To happen
But it did
Now we must
Embrace it
We must remember the past
Tend to the future
Yet live in the present

Surprises get in our way
Good or bad
But we cannot
Let them
Control us
We are strong
We love him
Yet we are still strong
We are a family.

Riley